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TEXTS ONLY: 513-828-7510

Providing The Advice & Guidance You & Your
Family Need To Make Informed Decisions

Providing The Advice & Guidance You & Your Family Need To Make Informed Decisions

When co-parenting with someone you have recently gone through a divorce with poses a unique set of challenges. Of course, both you and your co-parent want what is best for your child, but this is often easier said than done.

Nesting does not work for everyone. But for those that it does work for, you can potentially alleviate some of the strain of parenting in the aftermath of divorce while also maintaining healthy boundaries with your ex-spouse.

How does it work?

Divorce Mag discusses the benefits of bird nesting for the people that it works for. Bird nesting involves both parents taking turns living in the family home, with the child never leaving. This stands out against the more traditional approach in which the child moves between the dwellings of their parents in accordance with a custody order.

When not living in the family home, the “off-duty” parent can reside in a personal dwelling like an apartment or may choose to temporarily live with friends or family members as the situation shakes out.

Who does it work for?

Unfortunately, nesting does not work for everyone, though. If you and your ex-spouse have irreconcilable differences or you do not believe they can live in the family home and treat it with respect, this option might not fit you. The same goes if you believe an ex-spouse might have a history of abuse, even if you have no evidence to support the suspicions.

On the contrary, if you and your co-parent can cooperate in small bursts and make the situation work for the sake of your kid, you might want to give it a try.